ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND STUDENT TEACHING ERFORMANCE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION STUDENTS OF SAINT MICHAEL’S COLLEGE OF LAGUNA

SCHOOL YEARS 1994 – 1999

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Introduction

          Teacher education institutions play a vital role in the good training, instruction and development of prospective elementary and secondary education students in both academic and student teaching performance. According to some authorities, the teachers we need must have knowledge and skills. The elementary and secondary education students must have enough knowledge in the different subject clusters such as professional education courses, general education courses, major courses and skills in student teaching.

          The BEED and BSED students need background in the following subject areas because they are evaluated by their academic achievement. The concepts of theories they have learned in the general education courses which aim for acquisition of basics in different subjects such as English, Filipino, Mathematics and Science; and skills development provided by professional education courses which aim to equip future teachers with sociological, psychological and philosophical foundations of education; and principles and strategies of teaching adequately prepare student teacher perform satisfactory in student teaching. In addition the chosen field of specialization or major courses give the student teachers the exclusive opportunity to concentrate in one or two major for greater mastery of subjects. However, the thought of possessing a professional and personal qualifications obtained by taking academics courses does not guarantee their success in teaching. It is in student teaching where students of teacher education are given the opportunity to go through actual classroom experience.

          In effect, responding to these challenges may help education students become teachers they aspire to be. Specifically, if academic achievement and student teaching performance correlate positively, the attainment of the objective of education may be ensured. With the consideration, this study was undertaken in Saint Michael’s College of Laguna as teacher training institution that untiringly and endlessly seek to upgrade and maintain high quality education especially for prospective teachers so that they may become effective and efficient molders of young mind, fully equipped with gainful skills and right values and virtues.

 

Statement of the Problem

          This investigation was conducted among one – hundred eighty – seven (187) BEED and BSED students of Saint Michael’s College of Laguna school years 1994 – 1999. The study attempted to determine the relationship between academic achievement and student teaching performance of elementary and secondary education students of SMCL.

          It sought to answer the following specific questions:

  1. What is the academic achievement of the BEED students in their:

1.1            General Education Courses?

1.1.1      Mathematics

1.1.2      Humanities

1.1.3      Science and Health

1.1.4      Social Science

1.1.5      Languages

1.1.6      Other subjects

1.2            Professional Education Courses?

1.2.1    Foundation Courses

1.2.2    Pedagogy

  1. What is the academic achievement of the BSED students in their:

2.1            General Education Courses?

2.1.1    Mathematics

2.1.2    Humanities

2.1.3    Science and Health

2.1.4    Social Science

2.1.5    Languages

2.1.6    Other subjects

2.2            Professional Education Courses?

2.2.1    Foundation Courses

2.2.2    Pedagogy

2.3            Major Courses?

  1. What is the student teaching performance of:

3.1            BEED students?

3.2            BSED students?

4.     Is there any significant relationship between academic achievement and student teaching performance of:

4.1            BEED students?

4.2            BSED students?

 

Methodology

          The descriptive method of research using the correlation technique with documentary analysis was employed in the study. In this particular research, the focus was on the relationship between academic and student teaching performance of BEED and BSED students.

          The statistical procedures included were mean and standard deviation to describe their academic and student teaching performance and the Pearson Product – Moment Correlation Coefficient to determine the relationship between academic and student teaching performance. To test the correlation coefficient between the dependent and independent variables, the Z – test was used at 0.05 level of significance.

 Findings

Generally, the academic achievement of the BEED students attained a “satisfactory” achievement level (x = 2.0578). The BEED students attained a “satisfactory” performance in general education courses (x =2.0545) and did “satisfactory” performance also in the professional education courses (x=2.0551). Of the six subject cluster of general education courses that had been analyzed, the highest average rating is in Humanities ( x= 1.9192), followed by their obtained mean in Languages ( x = 1.9740 ), other subjects obtained a mean of 1, 9784, ( x = 1.9896 0 in Social Science, followed by Science and Health ( x = 2.2421 ) and the lowest mean in Mathematics ( x = 2.2712 ). The performance of the BEED students in Humanities, Languages, Other subjects, Social Science and Science and Health attained a “satisfactory” performance and a “moderately satisfactory” performance in Mathematics. The obtained mean for the two subjects categories of professional education courses i.e. Foundation courses and pedagogy are 2,2012 and 1,9827, respectively.

The general average of BSED students in their academic courses attained a “satisfactory” performance and ( x = 1.9062 ). The BSED students obtained a “satisfactory” performance in general education courses ( x = 1.9747) and obtained also a “satisfactory” performance (x = 1.9795) in terms of professional education courses and a “satisfactory” achievement level (x = 1.7643 ) in terms of Major courses. The performance of the BSED students in General Education courses by subject categories had been analyzed. Like the BEED students, the BSED students had the highest mean of 1.8692 in Humanities followed by Languages with ( x = 1.9024 ), Other subjects obtained a mean of 1.9504, ( x = 1.9704 ) in Social Science followed by Mathematics with ( x = 2.1938 ) and the lowest mean in Science and Health (x = 2.2159 ). The performance of the BSED students in the six subjects categories of General Education courses are all “satisfactory”. The obtained mean for the two subjects categories of professional education courses i.e. Foundation Courses and Pedagogy are 2.1586 and 1.9269, respectively. Both the BEED and BSED students attained a “satisfactory” performance in the two subject categories of professional educational courses. The BEED / BSED students included in this study attained a “satisfactory”  performance level in their student teaching, ( x = 1.8938 ) and ( x = 1.8041 )   respectively.

As shown in table 1 and 2, there was a significant relationship between  academic achievement and student teaching performance of both BEED and BSED students   with coefficient value  of ( r = +0.0538)  ( r = + 0.651) respectively. Between  the subject categories of general education  courses  and student  teaching performance, the computed  coefficient of correlation  among  the BEED students yielded a value  of 0.4594 in  Science  and Health,0.5090  in Social Science , 04518 in Languages, and  0.5785  in Other subjects which are descriptively substantial. The findings in this study indicate a slight correlation between Mathematics and Student Teaching, and between Humanities and Student Teaching with a coefficient  of correlation of  0.2935 and 0.3286 respectively. These are found significant at 0.05 level of confidence. Like in the BEED group the different subject categories of General Education courses such as Humanities, Science and Health, Social Science and Languages among the BSED students showed a marked relationship  with  student teaching performance. The coefficient of correlation are  0.4348, 0. 4985, 0.5080 and 0.4342 respectively. But Mathematics and Other  subjects had a slight  correlation with the student teaching performance of the group under study. The coefficients of correlation are 0.3053 and 0.3223 respectively. A significant relationship is found to exist  between each of the subject categories of General  Education  courses and student teaching performance. Between the subject categories of professional  education courses both the BEED and the  BSED  students yielded a value  which is descriptively substantial. The  coefficient of correlation  for the BEED  students are 0.5381 in Foundation  courses and 0.5245 in Pedagogy. The BSED  students obtained coefficient of correlation  between  Foundation courses and student teaching, and between Pedagogy and student teaching which are 0.5211 and 0.6291 respectively. This indicates significant relationship between each of the subject categories of professional education between each of the subject categories of professional  education courses and student teaching performance as a whole.

The Z- test resulted to the rejection of the null hypotheses. This means that statistically the relationships were really significant.            

 

Table 1 

Correlation  Coefficient Between  Academic  Achievement  and Student                       Teaching  Performance  of BEED Students.

 

 Over –all academic and student Teaching

 

Academic Achievement

Student  Teaching Performance

Interpretation

Z- Value

Interpretation

General  Education Courses

0.57920513

  Marked

relationship

6.0843868

 Significant

Professional

Education

Courses

0.477534605

  Marked

Relationship

5.0537512

 Significant

Average rating

0.538235103

  Marked

relationship

5.7009679

 Significant

 

General  Education courses by subject categories and student  Teaching

 

General Education Courses

Student

Teaching

 

Interpretation

Z- Value

Interpretation

Mathematics

 0.2935

   Slight relationship

 3.1058

  Significant

Humanities

 0.3286

   Slight

relationship

 3.4772

  Significant

Science and Health

 0.4591

    Marked

relationship

 4.8582

 Significant

Social  Science

 0.5090

   Marked  relationship

 5.3862

 Significant


 

General Education Courses

Student

Teaching

 

Interpretation

Z- Value

Interpretation

Languages

 0.4580

   Marked

Relationship

 4.8466

 Significant

Other Subject

 0.5785

   Marked

Relationship

 6.1217

 Significant

 

Professional  Education courses by subject Categories and student Teaching

 

Professional

Education

Courses

Student

Teaching

Interpretation

Z- Value

Interpretation

Foundation

 0.5381

 Marked relationship

  5.6942

 Significant

Pedagogy

 0.5254

 Marked

Relationship

 5.5503

 Significant

 

Table 2

Correlation  Coefficient  between  Academic Achievement  and Student  Teaching  Performance of BSED students

 

Over –all  academic  Achievement  and student  Teaching

 

Academic achievement

Student Teaching performance

Interpretation

Z-value

Interpretation

General Education courses

0.556490341

Marked relationship

4.7545

Significant

Professional education courses

0.64815317

Marked

relationship

5.5378

Significant

Major courses

0.457185195

Marked relationship

3.9052

Significant

Average rating

0.651296719

Marked relationship

5.5647

Significant

 

 

 

 

 

 

General  Education Courses by subject Categories  and Student Teaching

 

General Education Courses

Student

Teaching

Interpretation

Z-values

Interpretation

Mathematics

0.3053

Slight

Relationship

2.6094

Significant

Humanities

0.4348

 Marked relationship

3.7162

Significant

Science  and Health

0.4985

Marked

relationship

4.2607

Significant

Social Science

0.5080

Marked relationship

4.3419

Significant

Languages

0.4342

 Marked   relationship

 3.7111

Significant

Other  subject

0.3223

Slight  relationship

2.7547

Significant

 

Professional  Education Courses  by Subject categories and student teaching

 

Professional Education Courses

Student  Teaching

Interpretation

Z- value

Interpretation

Foundation  Courses

 0.5211

Marked relationship

4.4538

Significant

Pedagogy

 

0.6291

Marked relationship

 5.3769

Significant

 

 

Conclusion

The over all academic achievement of the BEED  students is satisfactory. The academic achievements on the subjects clusters namely  general education courses and professional  education  courses are satisfactory .The performance of the BEED students on the subject categories of general education courses, namely: Humanities, Science and Health, Social Science, Languages and other subjects are satisfactory and a moderately  performance in Mathematics. Their  performance  on the subject  categories of professional  education courses namely : Foundation  courses  and pedagogy are both satisfactory.

The academic  achievements of the BSED student in this study are also satisfactory. Their academic  achievements in the  three subject  clusters; namely; general  education courses, professional education courses and major courses are  all satisfactory. The performance  of  the BSED  students on the  subject  categories of general  education courses; namely :Mathematics, Humanities,  Science  and Health ,Social Science, Languages, and other  subject are all satisfactory. Their  performance  on the subject clusters  of  professional  education courses; namely Foundation courses and Pedagogy  are  both  satisfactory.

 The BEED and BSED  student  in this  study  show a satisfactory performance  in student  teaching.

Academic  achievements  in the  different  subject  clusters: general education courses, professional  education  courses (for BEED/ BSED) and major courses (for BSED only  are significantly  related to student  teaching  performance. The subject categories of general  education courses; namely: mathematics, Humanities, Science and Health, Social Science, Languages  and other subjects are significantly related to student  teaching  performance (for BEED / BSED students). The subject categories of professional  education  courses; namely; Foundation courses and Pedagogy  are also significantly related  to student  teaching performance (for BEED /BSED students)

 

Recommendations

1)     Since the BEED  and BSED students academic  performance  is interpreted as “satisfactory”, further improvement is possible  by enhancing  the  academic  courses.

2)     The BEED curriculum has been reviewed based on CHED Memorandum Order No.11 Series of 1999 and in the light of the findings of this  study  areas of concentration should be offered  aside from English ,Filipino and Mathematics effective  school  year 1999-2000.

3)     Since the BEED and BSED students  performance  in student teaching is interpreted  as “satisfactory” the College of Education  and Liberal Arts  should find ways of enriching  the student teaching program.

4)     Instruction in the  academic  courses- general, professional  and major  courses   should   be  upgraded  by providing  the BEED / BSED students  greater  exposure  to actual  teaching – learning  situation through informal observation of pupils / students  and teachers  in various situations.

5)     Research studies  on correlates of effective student  teaching  program and on  strategies on how to train prospective  teachers maybe undertaken.

References

 

   Aquino, Gaudencio V. and Razon , Perpetua A.  1992.  Educational psychology, Manila Philippines : Rex Printing Company ,Inc.

 

   Cañeda, Emma L.  1996. “ The  performance  of student teachers in North  Eastern  Mindanao College , Surigao City: A basis  for upgrading” Doctoral  Dissertation.

 

   CHED  Memorandum Order No. 59, Series of 1996

 

   CHED  Memorandum Order No.11, Series of 1999

 

   Hilbero ,Lydia  L. 1993. “ Predictors  of students teaching   performance  at PNU 1993”, Doctoral Dissertation ,Centro Escolar University. 

 

   Lardizabal Amparo S. and Campos Milagros A.. 1999. Theory and practice in student  teaching  Quezon City, Phillipppines : Katha Publishing Co., Inc.

 

   MECS  Order No. 37. Series 0f 1986.

 

 

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